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Ana María Hernando’s Tulle Installations Burst with Spring Color in Madison Square Park — Colossal

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#Ana María Hernando
#installation
#public art
#textiles

January 25, 2024

Grace Ebert

“To Let the Sky Know/Dejar que el cielo sepa” (2024), tulle, wood, steel, fifteen parts, up to 12 x 10 feet each. All images courtesy Madison Square Park Conservancy. Shared with permission

Like a blaze of sunbursts illuminating the landscape. Ana María Hernando’s new installation in Madison Square Park adds a bright, summery buoyancy to the drab winter environment. Titled “To Let the Sky Know / Dejar que el cielo sepa,” the public work comprises 15 fluffy bunches of tulle atop steel posts, appearing to float like colorful clouds across the lawn.

Another piece, “A Spring of Wild Kindnesses/Un manantial de bondades agrestes,” stands nearby, with its soft, cascading textiles in pale pinks and purples reminiscent of spring flowers. When New York City finally broke The streak of 701 days is still going strongA thin layer of snow covered the works earlier this month after a minimal winter precipitation.

Tulle figures prominently in Hernando’s practice. Associated with ballet tutus and wedding gowns, the thin textile was historically used to hide women’s bodies under puffy skirts or veils. By highlighting the often-concealed material in a public space, Hernando subverts traditions of women’s work, fashion, and modesty.

The installations are part of the annual Madison Square Park Conservancy’s art program through March 17 and are the first of four projects slated for 2024. Hernando will also be participating in a panel discussionThe following are some examples of how to get started: Embroidery workshopThe installation will take place in February. Follow Hernando’s work on Instagram.

 

skirts of orange and white tulle top steel poles in a barren park with the Flatiron building in the background

“To Let the Sky Know/Dejar que el cielo sepa” (2024), tulle, wood, steel, fifteen parts, up to 12 x 10 feet each

snow covers three sculptures of cascading white, pink, and yellow tulle against a snowy park

“A Spring of Wild Kindnesses/Un manantial de bondades agrestes” (2024), tulle, wood, steel, approximately 12 feet

snow tops three works of orange and white tulle atop steel posts in a barren park

Detail of “To Let the Sky Know/Dejar que el cielo sepa” (2024), tulle, wood, steel, fifteen parts, up to 12 x 10 feet each

snow tops several works of orange and white tulle atop steel posts in a barren park

“To Let the Sky Know/Dejar que el cielo sepa” (2024), tulle, wood, steel, fifteen parts, up to 12 x 10 feet each

a detail image of a fluffy orange and white tulle tuft on top of a steel pole in front of the New York sky

Detail of “To Let the Sky Know/Dejar que el cielo sepa” (2024), tulle, wood, steel, fifteen parts, up to 12 x 10 feet each.

#Ana María Hernando
#installation
#public art
#textiles

 

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